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Water Treatment

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Author(s): Yongabi KA
Published in: .   Oct 15, 2004
http://www.biotech.kth.se/iobb/news/kenneth04.doc

A cheaper way of purifying water needed to be found. The researcher used the seeds of Moringa oleifera among other plants and fungi. The seeds proved 90% efficient at cleaning dirty water. Its low impact on the environment versus chlorine and how common it is make it have the potential of providing clean water to many people.


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Author(s): Kumar S, K Gopar
Published in: Journal of Environmental Science and Health.   Oct 15, 1999
34 4 975-987
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1777052

Chemical methods of purifying water are not entirely fool-proof nor completely safe. In this study, Moringa oleifera and other plants were tested at their ability to stop bacterial growth. Researchers chose to use the leaves, and tested their effectiveness at pH levels in which human cells survive. Moringa proved to be about 90% efficient at stopping bacterial growth.


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Author(s): M Madsen, J Schlundt, EFE Omer
Published in: Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.   Jun 20, 1987
90 1 101-109
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3586089

Water purification systems in Sudan were evaluated during this experiment. Women in Sudan have been purifying the water they gather from the Nile for many years.

Water for this experiment was collected from the Blue Nile, the White Nile and an irrigation canal in Khartoum. Bacterial strains were added to the majority of the water collected.

Two types of plant seeds were used for the coagulation process, which was done in a laboratory in Copenhagen. The Moringa oleifera was found to be more effective for bacterial strain removal than its cousin, the Moringa steropetala from Madagascar.


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