Moringa Wiki

Moringa information that anyone can write and edit.

Welcome to the Moringa Wiki, a growing collection of articles on everything related to Moringa. Anyone can create or edit any article, so we can all work together to build a store of knowledge.

Most recent articles

 

Moringa seeds contain a high-quality oil that can be used for cooking. It is quite acceptable to taste, and does not become rancid. The oil is also very well-suited for use as a lubricant. Extracting oil Here is a simple method for extracting the oil from Moringa seeds: Brown the seed...


 

Moringa is native to the Indian sub-continent, but has spread to tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide. Here is a list of names for Moringa in languages from around the world. While Moringa oleifera is the most well-known species, some of these names may refere to other species of Morin...


 

Moringa leaves have not been found to be toxic. Very extensive health and safety studies conducted at the Noguchi Memorial Medical Research Centre in Ghana determined that Moringa leaf powder has no toxic elements. No adverse side effects from even the most concentrated Moringa diet were observed....


 

Using simple equipment, villagers in many countries purify water for their households with Moringa seeds. Studies have shown that this process not only removes solid contaminants, but also reduces amounts of harmful bacteria. However, if bacteria or microbes such as E. coli are present, Moringa...


 

A study at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (UK) found that Moringa seeds not only purify water but also soften it. The results of this study are found in: Suleyman A. Muyibi and Lilian M. Evison, "Moringa oleifera Seeds for Softening Hardwater," Water Research, Vol. 29, No. 4, 1995, pp...


 

The University of Leicester (UK) and the UK's Overseas Development Administration experimented with Moringa seeds for treating water on a commercial scale in Malawi, Africa. The researchers found that Moringa powder treated water just as well as imported commercial chemicals such as alum for far l...


 

Claims of Traditional Medicine For centuries, people in many countries have used Moringa leaves as traditional medicine for common ailments. Clinical studies have begun to suggest that at least some of these claims are valid. With such great medicinal value being suggested by traditional medicine,...


 

Moringa pods are quite nutritious, and can be cooked in a variety of ways. They can be boiled, steamed, fried -- essentially, cooked any way that one might use green beans or asparagus. The pods are best for eating when they are young and tender. When they are too old, they become woody an...


 

Moringa trees grow easily from seeds or cuttings. They grow quickly even in poor soil and bloom 8 months after planting. Where Moringa grows The Moringa tree grows mainly in semi-arid tropical and sub-tropical areas.  It grows best between 25 and 35 C (77 to 95 F), but will tolerate 48 C (...


 

Choose young, fresh, dark green leaves for cooking. They taste better and are more nutritious than older, yellowing leaves. Remove the stems from the leaves. Cook the leaves as you would any other green leafy vegetable, like spinach. If you boil the leaves, don't throw the water away after boil...


Disclaimer: Content on this article are works of individual users, and do not necessarily reflect the work of Trees for Life Journal, its editorial board or board of trustees.

 Copyright © 2018 Trees for Life Journal
 All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.

Powered By Geeklog