Moringa Gateway

Welcome to the Moringa Gateway, a free index of Moringa research article summaries that anyone can write and edit.



View by Category

Search by Keyword






Medicine

Add New Summary

Note: Many articles are available from their publishers for a fee. Articles available for free are marked as such.



Chemistry and Pharmacology of Moringa oleifera and Moringa con canescens

Author(s): Jadhav SL, SR Sharma, SC Pal, SB Kasture, VS Kasture
Published in: Indian Drugs.   Jan 29, 2000
37 3 139-144

Moringa has many traditional uses that science has
not previously investigated. The many compounds
and their known uses in medicine are presented. It
shows Moringa's pharmaceutical potential, thus
showing the need for further research into the
plant's properties.


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Pankaj, T. and A. Kar
Published in: Pharmacological Research.   Oct 29, 1999
41 3 319 319-323
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10675284

The role of Moringa Oleifera aqueous leaf extract was studied in adult male and female rats to determine if it was effective in the treatment of thyroid hormone status of animals. The purpose was to see if Moringa extract could be used to regulate thyroid abnormalities in humans.
Leaf power of the Moringa Oleifera was administered to 14 male and 14 female rats. Both groups were divided into control and experimental groups. The Moringa extract was administered with a feeding needle for ten days.

The experiment was completed in two phases, the first on male and female rats and the second with females only. The second administration with females involved higher doses of Moringa Oleifera. Results demonstrate the extract more effective in females than in males.

Results, also, indicate an inhibitory effect of Moringa Oleifera leaf extract in T3 synthesis and/or release. Effects were sex-specific and dosage-specific and more effective in females. T3 is the major thyroid hormone responsible for most metabolic effects of an organism (calorigenesis, oxygen consumption, and maintenance of basal metabolic rate). In the thyroid, T4 is synthesized by the thyroid gland and directly secreted into the blood. T3 is mainly found in peripheral tissues, especially the liver.

Females are more responsive to Moringa Oleifera. This may be related to the fact that females are five times more susceptible to thyroid abnormalities compared to males. A final observation: Higher doses of Moringa Oleifera aqueous leaf abstract may not be safe. Thus, the lower dose may be more useful in the treatment of hyper thyr


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Gupta M, UK Mazumder, S Chakrabarti
Published in: Fitoterapia.   Oct 14, 1999
70 3 244-250
S0367-326X(99)00029-5
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1919247

A certain extract of the root of Moringa oleifera proved to have effects on the central nervous system (CNS). When used with seditives and potent painkillers, it increased the drugs' power and duration. Its potential as a depressant warrants further study.


Edit Email this | History



Role of Moringa oleifera extract in the regulation of thyroid hormone status in adult male and female rats

Author(s): Tahiliani P, A. Kar
Published in: Pharmacological Research.   Aug 23, 1999
31 3 pp 319-323

A study was performed in order to determine the effects of Moringa oleifera leaf extracts on thyroidal hormones. Groups of rats were were orally given either distilled water, the control, or an equal amount of the extract for 10 days. Results showed decreases in the main thyroidal hormone (T3) and increases in its prohormone (T4), but results were only significant in female rats. A proposed explanation is that females are nearly five times as susceptible to thyroid imbalances, but also because of this, the study was repeated with female mice only and the doses changed. The higher dosage also showed the same decrease/increase in hormones, but did not significantly alter other chemical levels being monitored to determine safety of the drug, so the lower dosage was proclaimed safer to use for the treatment of hyperthyroidism.


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Guevara AP, C Vargas, H Sakurai, Y Fujiwara, K Hashimoto, M Kozuka, Y Ito, H Tokuda, H Nishino
Published in: Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutag.   Apr 6, 1999
440 2 181-188
10.1016/S1383-5718(99)00025-X
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10209341

Niazimicin
"Inhibition of EBV-EA activition was taken as an indication of potential antitumor promoting activity"
Mice were given a skin cancer, the control was left to develop tumors while the variable was treated with the compound niazimicin
"isolates 2, 3, and 8 tested for potential antitumor activity"
Niazimicin is a compound found within the seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. The researchers decided to study this particular compound, for nothing was known of its possible tumor-inhibiting properties. Niazimicin's effectiveness is compared to that of other chosen compounds.


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Guevara AP, C Vargas, H Sakurai, Y Fujiwara, K Hashimoto, M Kozuka, Y Ito, H Tokuda, H Nishino
Published in: Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutag.   Apr 6, 1999
440 2 181-188
10.1016/S1383-5718(99)00025-X
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10209341

Niazimicin
"Inhibition of EBV-EA activition was taken as an indication of potential antitumor promoting activity"
Mice were given a skin cancer, the control was left to develop tumors while the variable was treated with the compound niazimicin
"isolates 2, 3, and 8 tested for potential antitumor activity"
Niazimicin is a compound found within the seeds of Moringa oleifera Lam. The researchers decided to study this particular compound, for nothing was known of its possible tumor-inhibiting properties. Niazimicin's effectiveness is compared to that of other chosen compounds.


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Mazumder UK, M Gupta, S Chakrabarti, D Pal
Published in: Indian Journal of experimental biology.   Mar 23, 1999
37 6 612-614
http://grande.nal.usda.gov/ibids/index.php?mode2=detail&origin=ibids_references&therow=647204

This study examines the medicinal effects of Moringa oleifera roots. The authors did preliminary research on the roots, finding that the level of alkaloids in such might be helpful for managing liver and kidney diseases.

Roots for this experiment were gathered during the period of time between May and June. Once gathered, the roots were sun-dried and then extracted with methanol. The extraction was then administered through a four week period to Swiss albino mice. The mice were both female and male and were grouped into ten groups of ten. Each group was given a different dosage of the extraction, either low, medium or high.

It was found that the highest dosage, 46mg/kg body weight, did have tremendous effects on the liver and kidney function of the mice in that particular group. The mice who were given such dosages had a higher white blood cell count and less clotting time in addition to a positive change in plasma protein, blood urea and non-protein nitrogen. This information may be able to be able to later be studied in human liver and kidney disease patients.


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Kar A, BK Choudhary, NG Bandyopadhyay
Published in: Journal of Ethnopharmacology.   Feb 1, 1999
64 2 179-184
S0378-8741(98)00118-1
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T8D-3VS7DT0-C&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=8d941825959ffda39f194382a4925293

Researchers tested the efficiency of Moringa oleifera and other traditional Indian medicines in treating type two diabetes. The inorganic parts of Moringa's stem bark were taken from the plant and used to test their effects on blood sugar levels of rats. The study point to Moringa as a probable treatment for this type of diabetes by controlling blood sugar levels.


Edit Email this | History



Bioactive Compounds from the Leaves and Pods of Moringa oleifera

Author(s): Faiz S, BS Siddiqui, R Saleem, D Shehnaz, L Hameed-un-Nisa
Published in: New Trends in Natural Product Chemistry.   Nov 14, 1998
175-183

The Moringa oleifera has been studied for several years as to its medicinal uses. Each part of the tree can be used for nutritional and medicinal matters. This paper presents data found in experiments with rats and the effects Moringa seeds and pods had upon the animals. Such research may be further used in experimentation of similar and its effects on humans.


Edit Email this | History




Author(s): Hameed-un-Nisa L, D Shehnaz, S Faizi
Published in: New Trends in Natural Product Chemistry.   Oct 14, 1998
n/a n/a n/a n/a
http://books.google.com/books?id=jWd3_WqMkAcC&printsec=frontcover#PPA2,M1

The effects of Moringa oleifera on the parts of the nervous system involving blood vessels, the stomach, and other involuntary processes were unknown. Researchers studied how Moringa ofeilera extract from its pods and leaves affect adrenaline used for the vas deferens of rats, used as a model for blood vessel contraction. The extract did not stop contraction due to adrenaline.


Edit Email this | History



Disclaimer: Summaries and article information on this page are works of individual users, and do not reflect the work of Trees for Life Journal, its editorial board or board of trustees.

 Copyright © 2020 Trees for Life Journal
 All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.

Powered By Geeklog