Moringa Gateway

Welcome to the Moringa Gateway, a free index of Moringa research article summaries that anyone can write and edit.



View by Category

Search by Keyword






History of 'Comparative Studies on Nutritive Values of Tender Foliage of Seedlings and Mature Plants of Moringa oleifera LAM.'

Add New Summary

Note: Many articles are available from their publishers for a fee. Articles available for free are marked as such.



Comparative Studies on Nutritive Values of Tender Foliage of Seedlings and Mature Plants of Moringa oleifera LAM.

Author(s): D'Souza J and AR Kulkarni
Published in: Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany.   Jan 1, 1993
17 2 479-485

The nutritive value of tender foliage of seedlings four to eight months in age and mature trees of Moringa oleifera were compared. Samples were collected from plants grown without special irrigation or fertilizer treatment. Total proteins, lipids, vitamins A, B1, B6, and C, fiber, and ash were collected. Proteins, lipids, and vitamins A, B1, B6, and C were nearly double in the leaves of seedlings while fiber and ash were higher in the leaves of mature trees. The study concluded that seedling foliage of M. oleifera was higher in nutritive value than other common leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, fenugreek, lettuce, and spinach. The foliage would be a good source of fodder and fish feed as well. Foliage of seedlings 31 to 210 days in age has the highest vitamin content.


This is the current summary




Author(s): D'Souza J and AR Kulkarni
Published in: Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany.   Jan 1, 1993
17 2 479-485
http://

The nutritive value of tender foliage of seedlings four to eight months in age and mature trees of Moringa oleifera were compared. Samples were collected from plants grown without special irrigation or fertilizer treatment. Total proteins, lipids, vitamins A, B1, B6, and C, fiber, and ash were collected. Proteins, lipids, and vitamins A, B1, B6, and C were nearly double in the leaves of seedlings while fiber and ash were higher in the leaves of mature trees. The study concluded that seedling foliage of M. oleifera was higher in nutritive value than other common leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, fenugreek, lettuce, and spinach. The foliage would be a good source of fodder and fish feed as well. Foliage of seedlings 31 to 210 days in age has the highest vitamin content.


Set to this revision Revision: Mon, 22 May 2006 13:54:14 +0000



Disclaimer: Summaries and article information on this page are works of individual users, and do not reflect the work of Trees for Life Journal, its editorial board or board of trustees.

 Copyright © 2020 Trees for Life Journal
 All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.

Powered By Geeklog