Moringa Gateway

Welcome to the Moringa Gateway, a free index of Moringa research article summaries that anyone can write and edit.



View by Category

Search by Keyword






History of 'Fodder trees in Himachal Pradesh.'

Add New Summary

Note: Many articles are available from their publishers for a fee. Articles available for free are marked as such.



Fodder trees in Himachal Pradesh.

Author(s): Negi, S. S.
Published in: Indian Vet. Res. Inst., Patampur, Himachal Pradesh, India. I.   May 18, 1977
Vol.103 14 No.9 pp.616-622

While using tree leaves as livestock feed is a well known practice for most farmers, it is usually done in the absence of grains, grasses or other feed. In many mountainous regions such as northern India, however, trees are the main constituent in livestock diet. In wet, mountainous climates ill-suited for production of more common fodders such as grass and legumes, tree foliage could be a valuable asset to local agriculture.
Most tree fodder has a richer nutrient content than grass and non-legume fodders, containing crude fiber and high calcium, and with some species additional benefits include favorable taste and shade for farmers and animals. This article explores the pros and cons of various tree species employed for farm use in India.


This is the current summary




Author(s): Negi, S. S.
Published in: Indian Vet. Res. Inst., Patampur, Himachal Pradesh, India. I.   May 18, 1977
Vol.103 14 No.9 pp.616-622
http://

While using tree leaves as livestock feed is a well known practice for most farmers, it is usually done in the absence of grains, grasses or other feed. In many mountainous regions such as northern India, however, trees are the main constituent in livestock diet. In wet, mountainous climates ill-suited for production of more common fodders such as grass and legumes, tree foliage could be a valuable asset to local agriculture.
Most tree fodder has a richer nutrient content than grass and non-legume fodders, containing crude fiber and high calcium, and with some species additional benefits include favorable taste and shade for farmers and animals. This article explores the pros and cons of various tree species employed for farm use in India.


Set to this revision Revision: Mon, 22 May 2006 14:07:15 +0000




Author(s): Negi, S. S.
Published in: Indian Vet. Res. Inst., Patampur, Himachal Pradesh, India. I.   May 18, 1977
Vol.103 14 No.9 pp.616-622
http://

While using tree leaves as livestock feed is a well known practice for most farmers, it is usually done in the absence of grains, grasses or other feed. In many mountainous regions such as northern India, however, trees are the main constituent in livestock diet. In wet, mountainous climates ill-suited for production of more common fodders such as grass and legumes, tree foliage could be a valuable asset to local agriculture.
Most tree fodder has a richer nutrient content than grass and non-legume fodders, containing crude fiber and high calcium, and with some species additional benefits include favorable taste and shade for farmers and animals. This article explores the pros and cons of various tree species employed for farm use in India.


Set to this revision Revision: Thu, 18 May 2006 07:54:52 +0000




Author(s): Negi, S. S.
Published in: Indian Vet. Res. Inst., Patampur, Himachal Pradesh, India. I.   May 18, 1977
Vol.103 14 No.9 pp.616-622
http://

While using tree leaves as livestock feed is a well known practice for most farmers, it is usually done in the absence of grains, grasses or other feed. In many mountainous regions such as northern India, however, trees are the main constituent in livestock diet. In wet, mountainous climates ill-suited for production of more common fodders such as grass and legumes, tree foliage could be a valuable asset to local agriculture.
Most tree fodder has a richer nutrient content than grass and non-legume fodders, containing crude fiber and high calcium, and with some species additional benefits include favorable taste and shade for farmers and animals. This article explores the pros and cons of various tree species employed for farm use in India.


Set to this revision Revision: Thu, 18 May 2006 07:53:30 +0000



Disclaimer: Summaries and article information on this page are works of individual users, and do not reflect the work of Trees for Life Journal, its editorial board or board of trustees.

 Copyright © 2020 Trees for Life Journal
 All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners.

Powered By Geeklog