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History of 'Effects of feeding different levels of foliage from Moringa oleifera to creole dairy cows on intake, digestibility, milk production and composition'

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Author(s): Reyes Sanchez, Nadir, Eva Sporndly, Inger Ledin
Published in: Livestock Science.   Sep 9, 2005
http://www.moringanews.org/documents/LivestProd.pdf

From a long-term perspective, traditional systems of milk and beef production in Nicaragua are often economically marginal and unsustainable. In the six months of dry period, each year, grass yield is generally insufficient to satisfy the nutritional requirements of animals. The nutritional stress of this consequently decreases animal productivity. Supplementation with concentrates during the dry season is not generally profitable because it is expensive. Moringa grows in all types of soil from acidic to alkaline, and at altitudes from sea level to 1800 m.
This study, conducted in Nicaragua, tests the effect of feeding varying amounts of Moringa. Six cows were used and were fed as follows: hay only, hay with 2 kg dry mass of Moringa, and hay with 3 kg dry mass of Moringa. Hay and Moringa were offered in separate troughs to individual cows. The cows that ate the most Moringa had higher total intake, higher milk production, and higher dietary digestibility. Milk production increased although quality of the milk remained unchanged.


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Author(s): Nadir Reyes Sa´nchez a, Eva Spo¨rndly b, Inger Ledin b,*
Published in: Livestock Science.   Sep 9, 2005
http://www.moringanews.org/documents/LivestProd.pdf

From a long-term perspective, traditional systems of milk and beef production in Nicaragua are often economically marginal and unsustainable. In the six months of dry period, each year, grass yield is generally insufficient to satisfy the nutritional requirements of animals. The nutritional stress of this consequently decreases animal productivity. Supplementation with concentrates during the dry season is not generally profitable because it is expensive. Moringa grows in all types of soil from acidic to alkaline, and at altitudes from sea level to 1800 m.
This study, conducted in Nicaragua, tests the effect of feeding varying amounts of Moringa. Six cows were used and were fed as follows: hay only, hay with 2 kg dry mass of Moringa, and hay with 3 kg dry mass of Moringa. Hay and Moringa were offered in separate troughs to individual cows. The cows that ate the most Moringa had higher total intake, higher milk production, and higher dietary digestibility. Milk production increased although quality of the milk remained unchanged.


Set to this revision Revision: Thu, 25 May 2006 09:20:54 +0000




Author(s): Nadir Reyes Sa´nchez a, Eva Spo¨rndly b, Inger Ledin b,*
Published in: Livestock Science.   May 18, 2005
http://www.moringanews.org/documents/LivestProd.pdf

From a long-term perspective, traditional systems of milk and beef production in Nicaragua are often economically marginal and unsustainable. In the six months of dry period, each year, grass yield is generally insufficient to satisfy the nutritional requirements of animals. The nutritional stress of this consequently decreases animal productivity. Supplementation with concentrates during the dry season is not generally profitable because it is expensive. Moringa grows in all types of soil from acidic to alkaline, and at altitudes from sea level to 1800 m.
This study, conducted in Nicaragua, tests the effect of feeding varying amounts of Moringa. Six cows were used and were fed as follows: hay only, hay with 2 kg dry mass of Moringa, and hay with 3 kg dry mass of Moringa. Hay and Moringa were offered in separate troughs to individual cows. The cows that ate the most Moringa had higher total intake, higher milk production, and higher dietary digestibility. Milk production increased although quality of the milk remained unchanged.


Set to this revision Revision: Tue, 23 May 2006 12:41:00 +0000



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