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History of 'In-vitro availability of Iron in Various Green Leafy Vegetables'

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In-vitro availability of Iron in Various Green Leafy Vegetables

Author(s): Chawla S., A. Sanena, S. Seshadri
Published in: Journal of the science of food and agriculture.   Feb 10, 1988
46 1 pp. 125-12

Commonly used green leafy vegetables were tested for iron availability when included with a common meal in India (wheat chapati and potato). Included in this study were the leaves of Moringa oleifera, referred to in this study by its 'drumstick' name. Overall, the drumstick leaves' iron content was reasonably high in comparison to other vegetables, though certainly not the highest. The only outstanding result found in the drumstick leaves was their absorbic acid amounts, which was over twice the amount of that in several of the other tested vegetables. What was determined in this study was that while iron levels seem unrelated to those of absorbic acid, they suggest possible relations between oxalate and/or polyphenols.


This is the current summary




Author(s): Chawla S., A. Sanena, S. Seshadri
Published in: Journal of the science of food and agriculture.   Feb 10, 1988
46 1 pp. 125-12
http://mail.treesforlife.org:8083/moringa_articles/Chawla_1988_JSciFdAgric_Mo.pdf

Commonly used green leafy vegetables were tested for iron availability when included with a common meal in India (wheat chapati and potato). Included in this study were the leaves of Moringa oleifera, referred to in this study by its 'drumstick' name. Overall, the drumstick leaves' iron content was reasonably high in comparison to other vegetables, though certainly not the highest. The only outstanding result found in the drumstick leaves was their absorbic acid amounts, which was over twice the amount of that in several of the other tested vegetables. What was determined in this study was that while iron levels seem unrelated to those of absorbic acid, they suggest possible relations between oxalate and/or polyphenols.


Set to this revision Revision: Thu, 16 Aug 2007 11:25:22 +0000



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